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Changing Perspectives

From this height, the Eastern Cape province is a frothy milky white plain, it is a convuluted dark ridged surface, hilly green and olive region bounded by the blue of the ocean, which stretches away to vanish into a wall of tall white clouds - clouds which seem to live here above the warmer waters of the tail of the Mozambique current. Although the perspective is unusual, the feeling for this piece of land is the same. I know what beauty lies down there below me. Even from up here it remains, but transformed. Now a golden fiery snake winds its way beneath. It's broad body is incandescent in the rising sun, twisting this way and that between what must be tall mountains, but seem to be bumps. It can only be the mighty Caledon, the other boundary of this region.

Beside the mighty river, hut roofs glint like diamonds. I am transported into a future where the inhabitants of these dwellings grow up knowing that they have a right to know, that they have the means to know and that they can know about all subjects of human knowledge. The economy that powers this knowledge is built to 95% on renewable energy. Photovoltaics have been revolutionised - their efficiency ratio is still not much above 12,5%, but they are manufactured from cheap plastics that are in turn derived from agricultural by-products and seed oils, right here in the Eastern Cape. These cheap cells are everywhere, and the plentiful sun of this area keeps the knowledge turning over. Solid state cells built of myriads of capacitors keep systems running over night, during darkness, etc. Or cheaper hydrogen cells which occasionally need to be watered, like crops. Even the aeroplane I am sitting in is run on a mixture of Hydrogen, Nitrogen and Oxygen all produced through the renewable power.

A future I look forward to and am building towards.


By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: October 2nd 2008 05:53

Changing Perspectives

From this height, the Eastern Cape province is a frothy milky white plain, it is a convuluted dark ridged surface, and it is a hilly green and olive surface bounded by the blue of the ocean, which stretches away to vanish into a wall of tall white clouds - clouds which seem to live here above the warmer waters of the tail of the Mozambique current. Although the perspective is unusual, the feeling for this piece of land is the same. I know what beauty lies down there below me. Even from up here it remains, but transformed. Now a golden fiery snake winds its way beneath. It's broad body is incandescent in the rising sun, twisting this way and that between what must be tall mountains, but seem to be bumps. It can only be the mighty Caledon, the other boundary of this region.

Beside the mighty river, hut roofs glint like diamonds. I am transported into a future where the inhabitants of these dwellings grow up knowing that they have a right to know, that they have the means to know and that they can know about all subjects of human knowledge. The economy that powers this knowledge is built to 95% on renewable energy. Photovoltaics have been revolutionised - their efficiency ratio is still not much above 12,5%, but they are manufactured from cheap plastics that are in turn derived from agricultural by-products and seed oils, right here in the Eastern Cape. These cheap cells are everywhere, and the plentiful sun of this area keeps the knowledge turning over. Solid state cells built of myriads of capacitors keep systems running over night, during darkness, etc. Or cheaper hydrogen cells which occasionally need to be watered, like crops. Even the aeroplane I am sitting in is run on a mixture of Hydrogen, Nitrogen and Oxygen all produced through the renewable power.

A future I look forward to and am building towards.

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: October 2nd 2008 04:53

Speech from Solar Computer Lab Opening

Ron Wertlen held a speech as the solar computer lab project coordinator at the official launch ceremony on the 1st of August 2008. The following conveys the sense of the speech:
"Good day dignitaries and guests, ladies and gentlemen of the community, educators and learners. I am very glad to see you all here! Thank you indeed for coming. We have looked forward to this day together for quite some time.

I will keep the speech short, because this should be a festive occasion and not one of long-winded speeches.

There is an important thing I wish to impress on all of you learners, as you begin to work with the computers that have been brought to your schools. Words that are spoken are like the dust outside on the street [1]. They are ephemeral and blown about by the slightest breeze and can be a nuisance. You cannot build a house with dust. If you however gather that dust and form it into a brick [2], and make several bricks then you can build yourself a house. You can trade bricks and you can help your neighbour build his house by giving him some bricks. The written word is like a brick. You can use it to build a roof over your heads. So remember this when you use the computer - write down your thoughts and share them with others. It will make you a richer person.

Secondly, another important thing: When you work at the laptops, remember to sit up straight. Don't sit at the computer all bent and crooked - you will end up looking like me, and you might get back pains.

Thirdly, the prizes for the drawing competition are being handed over aftewards at the outdoor party. Please all come over.

Thank you very much and enjoy the day!"
Check out photos of the Launch...

Notes:
  1. Tafalehashi at the end of Winter is a very very dusty place. The dust permeates everything and there is no escaping it.

  2. Most of the housing in the area is built with mud bricks. The finest dust that blows around turns into the slickest and best mud when wettened. Just add straw, place in a brck form and cure in the sun.

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: September 9th 2008 08:48

"BEE failure": BEE was a quick win, now the hard work starts

To expect the BEE programme to succeed within the space of one generation, and without a strategic plan for broad based empowerment - not only in an economic sense - is plain silliness. The so-called "failure of BEE" which is currently in the news originates from a KPMG audit of large companies BEE scores this last week. This failure proves that economic empowerment alone is not enough to allow broad inclusion in South African business.

While the idea of BEE as a rectifier of legacy Apartheid imbalance is fundamentally correct. However, the devil is always in the detail. Thus the first version of BEE did not do enough and now apparently also the version 2.0 Broad-Based BEE is failing. Working on the ground and in schools in impoversihed areas, we see the reason for this. Everyone wants a "quick win". In IT business we speak of "quick wins" when we want to implement a speedy interim solution with a very visible effect. It's an interim solution because the infrastructure required to make the solution work sustainably has to catch up, or the quickly written code does not comply with standards. Quick wins are very important, because they keep managers off your neck (they have something to show) and the development team has gained confidence.

In the same way, the BEE song has kept the public appeased for a while and the developers of South African society have had some time to go forward with deep changes. These changes are coming along too slowly. Especially in the Eastern Cape and in the Eastern Cape education department we have seen very few, very slow advancements. Infrastructure and educational quality is sadly lacking. And without education only a very brittle broad base can be developed, if any at all.

With a strong and educated broad base, programs like the BBBEE and BEE will truly have the chance to achieve what they set out to do. Balance Apartheid injustice.

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: September 7th 2008 01:12

ECSPIRT Project First Training Session: The sun lighting up the night.

After the successful launch things at the school are settling into a routine. We want to keep an eye on what the schools are doing with the computers and to assist by training the teachers as we have the time and also to encourage them that the facilities are easy to use and beneficial to them. In other words, over time, we want to influence the routine so that the teachers bring the IT component into their teaching and into their school life.

A further aim is the search for potential champions - people who come forward and volunteer their time and services and are enthusiastic.

With this intention in mind, Ron Wertlen made a trip to the schools on the 14/8 - 16/8. He stayed over at the trading store of Pieter Venter. On this visit it became apparent that the school and community are growing aware of the possibilities and they want to cooperate with each other and make the most of the facilities. For instance:
  • Keenan who works at the trading store is repairing windows at Zwelenqaba after hours as a service to the community. He is being helped by Mcebisi, who also works at the trading store and who was born at Tafalehashi and went to school at Zwelenqaba.

  • Zukiswa Mavonyala (also Zwelenqaba alumnus) and Mcebisi approached Mr. Ziduli to find out under what conditions the community can use the laptops. They both have some computer knowledge and are very keen to complete the Open International Computer Drivers Licence course. They are both potential trainers for the community and we are considering sending them to East London to take part in a trainers' course.
Also it is clear that the routine is already becoming quite healthy:
  • All the schools have been using their computer equipment since the launch. Ron was told this in discussion with the teachers and he independantly verified this by checking logs and seeing the state of the computers.

  • Mr. Yankey has downloaded Geography lecture aids from the Internet and wants to get his students to use them easily. For this purpose, Ron setup a shared area on the server harddisk.

  • All the schools have been logging their electricity usage from the solar panels. All the solar systems are working at full capacity and Voltage levels are high.

Ron held several training workshops.

Workshop: Zwelenqaba
[ The workshop was held in the evening from 5pm till about 7.30pm. Students representing several matric classes were there. as we worked, I was aware that the brightly lit scene in front of me was a direct result of stored solar power - the sun lighting up the night.]

The main aim at Zwelenqaba, was to involve the entire matric class with the computing resource and to familiarise them with the starting and shutdown of the system. Also the learners were sensitized about the different kinds of things they can do with the computers in a Question and answer session. Different rules for the computer lab were discussed.

During the workshop, the learners learnt about the different resources on the VIKO server. The facilities that were explored were:
  • Wikipedia encyclopedia - students looked up topics that they liked
  • VIKO Video lessons - a lot of learners enjoyed these.
  • Typing tutor - several decided they would like to improve their knowledge of the keyboard.
After about an hour of VIKO exploration, several students wanted to express themselves by typing using Open Office Writer.
"There is one thing that I know: every where I go that Jesus love Has never fail me yet up to this far. If I get tired along the way He gives Me power to press on." (Sinazo Sajini)

"What is important in computer is to learn how to type faster and you must practice always when you get into the Lab. When you are able to type very faster I promise you are going to be interested in typing. After typing you can do every thing that will make you interested.

YOU KNOW WHAT? Computer work as stupid thing, that means computer need somebody to operate it , like if you send it to the wall it will hit the wall if you don't control it."(BONGA MAPHIKE)
Teacher Training workshops were held at Kwantshunqe and at Bafazi JSS. Here the teachers' technology-related problems were resolved, mainly problems accessing the network and then there were some questions about the resources available. Several teachers made contributions to the local wikipedia copy.

On Saturday morning, community training took place despite torrential rains. At about 8am my car got stuck in the muddy bog that the road reverts to when it rains. There was not a person in sight anywhere. Then the first pupil for the training course arrived - Zukiswa Mavonyela. Soon the second person Mcebisi Lukozi. I hope to be writing a lot more about these two as time goes on. We started the first chapter of the Open ICDL and discussed the relative sizes of storage media such as DVDs, USB disks and HDDs. It was a very productive session and both showed that they understood and could handle basic computer tasks. Mr. Saiti also arrived on cue at about 9.30. Mr. Saiti is an engaged member of the community who has no idea about computers at all. Zukiswa and Mcebisi practised showing him the basics of the computer.

With the end of the lesson, the clouds parted for a minute and we left the classroom in streaming sunshine. A few passers-by helped push the car out of it's predicament. The wet morning left its mark on me though - I was sick for a couple of days after with an acute flu!

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: August 24th 2008 11:57

South Africa's First Solar Powered Computer Lab?

I don't know how they researched it, but the Grocott's mail is calling our "solar powered computer lab"(*) a South African first, and it may very well be. As one adds up all the work we have put into this project, motivating the community for over a year, a careful selection of sub-contractors for some of the work, coordination of needs, interests and publicity, all required to launch the project successfully, I can guess why this has not been done before.

Some more facts about our solar computer lab:
( Since we are using laptops, which are locked away in a safe, there is an installation time. )
  • with the power cables and mice at their stations (as they usually are), it takes one person about 10 minute to take the 25 laptops out of the safe and attach them to their leashes.
  • to ready the classroom from scratch (i.e. power cables and mice are not at their stations) it takes about 30 minutes.
(*) By "solar powered computer lab", we mean a computer installation counting at least 20 computers and peripherals including but not restricted to printers, copiers and projectors, in a dedicated room powered solely by solar power.

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: August 18th 2008 03:48

Successful Launch of Solar Computer Lab

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Yesterday the school launched it's solar computer lab with visitors from the Department of Education at Elliotdale (local), Idutywa (cluster), and East London/Zwelitsha (province), Nelson Mandela Institute, Telecom Techniques , Roshcon, Dell Development Fund SA, Dabba Telecomm, SELF and eKhaya ICT - a very good turnout indeed.

Image at top: Mr. Mamane holding a business economics class - introducing how word processing works.

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Guest of honour Robert "Bob" Freling is given a certficate of appreciation at the event. It was a day on which no one left empty-handed. And heart-felt thanks to everyone involved from me! It was a fantastic day.

And a great vote of thanks to SELF for doing this self-less work (not to mention the other sponsors).

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: August 2nd 2008 05:03

Learnthings Workshop Report

The first Learnthings workshop was held from the 14th - 18th of July by Susanna Ackermann. The outcome of the workshop was quite positive. Partly, the initial phase is an alignment of the teachers interests, the available resources and the learner's needs. Susanna did a great job in introducing the teachers to the resources at the computer lab and in making the programmes work for the teachers as they wanted to also. It was also important to awake new realisations about the possibilities to organise information through computing and to see mark sheets in a spread sheet instead of on paper. Susanna was very professional in her attitude - one could clearly see that she has long experience with the rural situation, she was always calm and focused on the outcomes.

Susanna could also confirm our realisation that there are teachers with good skills at the school:
"Fortunately there are teachers with really good skills and I am convinced that they will transfer knowledge and hand-held some of the others, who had their first experience with working with computers."
The full training report, which mirrors the fairly chaotic environment at the school is available here (Learnthings training report).

Thanks very much for your effort Susanna!

Fortunately this is only the start. This week, we will be working out a further training schedule for teachers at the three schools and we will see to it that the resources steadily gain in value to the schools by virtue of their use.

LearnThings Training Report - SELF.pdf
Download this document in Adobe PDF.
[download]



By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: July 28th 2008 09:18

Solar Computer Lab Opening in Rural Area 1st of August.

This is a press release I wrote in a hurry to publicise our opening. It seems like the turnout will be quite good, despite the late efforts at publicizing it. Nosimo Balindlela is not coming, she just stepped down as Premier of the EC.

The Solar Electric Light Fund (SELF) unveils a new concept lab: a 25 computer laptop laboratory with local video streaming server, wireless mesh network connecting 3 neighbouring schools, peripherals and Internet access, powered by pure solar energy. The laboratory is installed at Zwelenqaba Senior Secondary School in an impoverished remote rural area in South Africa and is being launched on the 1st of August 2008. The project was made possible by a grant from the Kellogg Foundation, with additional support from other sponsors including JPMorgan Chase, Dell South Africa Development Fund, Dabba Telecommunication, Learnthings and eKhaya ICT.

Near Nelson Mandela's birthplace of Qunu, an Apartheid legacy still rules everyday life. Families of migrant mine workers lived in rural isolation while the men of the families dug out the precious ore which helped build the country. Today, 14 years after Apartheid, roads are slowly being rebuilt, and grid electricity is slowly being extended to vital hospitals, clinics and schools. Mr. Mandela's 90th birthday proclamation that "poverty has gripped our people", really applies here. What is more, South Africa is experiencing a shortage of electricity as its parastatal power company is failing to meet unprecedented demand. Following rolling brown outs ("load shedding") earlier in the year, the country's power supply is balancing on a thin edge.

The South African Department of education has set itself ambitious goals to have all school leaving learners computer literate by 2012. These goals cannot be met unless the necessary infrastructure is provided to schools. SELF's solar computer laboratory is one way to provide schools with much needed infrastructure, without burdening the electricity grid further. Also it is a model which can easily be applied in the rest of Africa, where grid electricity is almost unknown. SELF decided to use laptops in the laboratory, for several reasons: they have low power consumption, can be safely stored overnight and can be used in classrooms that don't have electricity and thus integrated into any curriculum lessons anywhere in the school. The brand new laptops were donated by the Dell South Africa Development Fund and are equipped with wireless technology, which allows the laptops to access a wireless mesh network. The mesh network shares resources among the three schools that are involved in the project: Zwelenqaba Senior Secondary School, Bafazi Junior Secondary School (JSS) and Kwa'Ntshunqe JSS. The resources shared on the network are multimedia learning tools on a server and Internet access points. Plans exist to extend the network to join other nearby school networks. Resources on the Video-In Knowledge-Out (VIKO) server donated by Dabba Telecommunications include 1500 hours of video tuition and several interactive lessons.

Learnthings has donated digital curriculum content that will enable teachers to teach more effectively by providing stimulating material for learners. This material is part of a corpus developed for the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) e-Schools project. Learnthings has provided and is in the process of providing training for teachers on how to effectively integrate Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), into their teaching. Further a programme for cultural exchange and remote training via Internet is being developed together with the learners at the school by eKhaya ICT. The ultimate goal of this effort, the Eastern Cape Schools Participatory Internet Training (ECSPIRT) programme, is the inclusion of rural learners and communities in the digital society. Cooperation with the Nelson Mandela Institute (responsible for Bafazi JSS) and the Department of Education as well as Rhodes University and the University of Fort Hare are also being started to maximise use of the laboratory through teacher training and technical support. An innovative programme by the Universities is being tested to improve sustainability of the ICT infrastructure in rural areas. All of these activities link into SELF's Solar Integrated Development (SID) Model, which is being developed to help make remote communities self sufficient for all their needs.


By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: July 27th 2008 09:51

Solar Powered Computer Lab Completed

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The work of the past months has been rewarded. The Solar Powered Computer Lab is completed and fully functioning. Now the real work begins - to ensure that the lab and infrastructure are put to good use and to slowly make the lab sustainable through this effort. What this means in practical terms, is that we will be looking at new applications of the available computing technology to produce value for the community - whether this is in terms of generating money somehow for the community through computer usage or whether it is in terms of value to the community such as matriculants getting University bursaries as a result of the programme...

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The official opening of the school infrastructure will be on Friday the 1st of August 2008 at 11:00 am. The guest list already is gathering some interesting luminaries:
Mike Eckhart, President of the American Council of Renewable Energy (ACORE), Robert Freling - Director of SELF. I will post more names as they show up on the radar.
There is also still much work to be done in terms of bringing this effort under the roof of the Department of Education. We welcome more cooperation and collabortion with the Department.

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We are working on getting the photo galleries up to date... :-) Just another item on the ToDo list...

By: Ron Wertlen [permalink]
Posted: July 20th 2008 09:12
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